[USOE-News] Education News Roundup 09-28-09

Peterson, Mark Mark.Peterson at schools.utah.gov
Mon Sep 28 12:51:52 MDT 2009


Education News Roundup
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Today's Top Picks:

Trib looks at Utah's only NCLB-restructured school.
http://www.sltrib.com/education/ci_13421699

D-News looks at what UEA moving its convention up to this weekend has wrought.
http://cli.gs/d4Gh5b

How many jobs will there be for new teachers next year?
http://cli.gs/Ht8Hpu (OSE)

Gerald Bracey is trying to bust some public education myths.
http://cli.gs/jQgdG6

More school = better results?
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33054056/ns/us_news-education/

Elementary school song from last year's Black History Month causing a ruckus in conservative circles.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33031485/ns/us_news-education/
and http://cli.gs/X65mmy (Fox News)
and http://cli.gs/E7NJtd (Daily Voice)
or Glen Beck
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPMnbyX5C4w

Are smaller classes better?
http://cli.gs/mHtZME
and http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113176988

PTA losing ground across the country?
http://cli.gs/mRtsaY (WaPo)



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TODAY'S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Troubled Eagle View Elementary coming back to life
Education: Elementary was the first in Utah to be restructured under the No Child law.

UEA switch throws wrench in works
Change in dates affects breaks and delays count

Student teachers worry about jobs

Charter recruits refugees
American Preparatory Academy hopes to give newcomers a leg up

$5M expansion of DaVinci in Ogden wrapping up

Technology powers up learning in Ogden City School District

Parents, district clash about medication

Schools plan H1N1 vaccinations

Davis High students excel on AP tests

Local teen determined to succeed

Is Garfield School sale a hush-hush deal?
Government: Developer says presumed sale to Westminster College is too cozy.

Developer to donate property to Box Elder School Board

State Web site tracking stimulus funds

Judge releases ex-teacher from jail

Jordan coach is suspended, fined $750
Prep football: The UHSAA takes action after an ineligible player practices with team.

Layton High School teacher-former student relationship investigation opened

Teen stable after parade injury
Broken collarbone, ribs for Syracuse mayor's daughter

West Point Elementary School to celebrate 140 years

Playwright aims to show reality of teaching
Production is meant to move all interested in education to action

Students learn culture through music

Students plant Utah state trees, wishes for the future

Students get hands-on lesson about careers in emergency services

Facing the Past
Polk students peek at ancient Egypt

High-flying delivery to Weber High
Helicopter ride to game proves being mascot not so bad after all

Inside Our Schools






OPINION & COMMENTARY

Boost test scores

A letter to fathers

Beehives and Buffalo Chips

Will No Child Left Behind finally get reauthorized?

The least fun game ever

Charter school debate over?

Contest - Kids can create character for book

Answers to bond questions

Preparing for H1N1

Nice for them

Expanding where the needs are

UEA Has No Dealings With ACORN

Sounds crazy

Sanction legislators

Brainwashing children

Bush's speech also scrutinized

President was hypocritical in speech

Homework was main speech issue

Obama's school speech available on Web

Reading Incomprehension

Reading Is Not a Skill--And Why This Is a Problem for the Draft National Standards

Accountability in Education: High Hopes and False Promises

School choice would reshape U.S. education

Tackling Bullying Based on Sexual Identity

Bad Title, Mind-Changing Book

Could Common State Standards Impact Quality?

Nine Myths About Public Schools






NATION

More school? Obama could trim summer break
President, education chief want to lengthen days, keep schools open later

Unions Criticize Obama's School Proposals as 'Bush III'

Phantom School Districts Tagged for Stimulus Dollars

Kids' Obama song: Sincere or idolization?
Conservative opinion leaders outraged at seven-month-old video

Management Guru Says 'Student Load' Key to Achievement
Study of Eight Districts Looks at School Autonomy

Professor: Smaller Class Sizes Optimal For Kids

While Unnecessary, Swine Flu Closes Schools

Making Science Class The Coolest Period In School

What did Founding Fathers believe?
Finding a consensus will be tricky for those developing new state curriculum

Series Introduction: Helping Our Teachers

Fairfax Schools Drop Out Of PTA
Splinter Groups Have Local Focus

In Search of The Real Michelle Rhee
Arrogant or dynamic? Harsh or honest? Inside the mind of D.C.'s controversial schools chief

Can the Right Kinds of Play Teach Self-Control?

Policing kids' online behavior
Some schools monitor off-campus conduct

When the Cool Get Hazed

New Dating Seminars Target Teen Violence

Coming Out in Middle School

Football highest in injuries, study shows

Thinking Outside The School Lunchbox
Va. to Follow Md.'s Homegrown Lead

Tony Danza Shows High School Students Who's Boss






------------------------------------------------------------
UTAH NEWS
------------------------------------------------------------

Troubled Eagle View Elementary coming back to life
Education: Elementary was the first in Utah to be restructured under the No Child law.

        Roosevelt - Some considered it the worst school in Utah.
        West Middle School was the first and only school in the state to close for failing to meet the goals of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) for too many years in a row.
        But the school, which sits near the heart of the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation, has been reborn. It has a new name, new educators and new philosophy -- and it's making progress. In its first year as Eagle View Elementary, the school boosted attendance and some state test scores among American Indian students, who make up about 80 percent of the school's population, recent NCLB results show. And according to tests given in the district, more students made significant academic progress at Eagle View than the year before.
        For a school that has long struggled with poverty and cultural clashes, it's a glimpse into a hopeful, brighter future.
http://www.sltrib.com/education/ci_13421699



UEA switch throws wrench in works
Change in dates affects breaks and delays count

        Several hundred teachers won't be able to attend this year's Utah Education Association convention unless they take a one- to two-day pay cut.
        Alpine, Provo and Nebo School districts, which are among almost a dozen districts throughout Utah opting to stick with their traditional mid-October fall break rather than cancel classes Oct. 1 and 2 for the UEA conference in which teachers attend workshops and listen to national speakers.
        "It's unfortunate," said Provo district educator Schipper Clayson. He will pay $80 for a substitute teacher to replace him at school Thursday.
        Further, the UEA date change puts the convention on the same day as the statewide annual Oct. 1 enrollment count. "It kind of caught us by surprise," said Randy Raphael, school statistics specialist with the State Office of Education.
http://cli.gs/d4Gh5b (DN)



Student teachers worry about jobs

        OGDEN - By the end of the school year, a lot of student teachers will struggle to land teaching positions. Erin Garner and Jan Healy hope they aren't among them.
        Garner, who attended Weber State University has been teaching English and Spanish at Ogden High School for a week now and loving every minute of it. She comes from a family of teachers. Her husband, David, is counting on her to do well and find a job so she can put him through medical school.
        But rumors of tighter budgets, fewer teaching positions and possible hiring freezes cause concern for Garner and student teachers all over the state.
http://cli.gs/Ht8Hpu (OSE - $ Registration)




Charter recruits refugees
American Preparatory Academy hopes to give newcomers a leg up

        Two flies play tag around Ali Abdiraham's head. One buzzes to a stop on the collar of his nearly new, navy polo shirt, but the 8-year-old doesn't flinch. Ali's attention - and that of the rest of his family of eight (minus the baby, who is busily munching on Dad's keys) - is riveted on the homework assignment in front of him.
        Dad smiles anxiously as a woman from Ali's school explains, slowly, stressing her enunciation, that a parent should point at each word as the third-grader reads it aloud. Mom nods in affirmation, but she looks uncertain. Even Ali is a little confused - and he has to translate the conversation for his parents, who came to West Valley City from Kenya as refugees just five years ago.
        "It's difficult sometimes," said Katherine Findlay, refugee outreach coordinator for American Preparatory Academy. "Not only are we trying to communicate with people from a different culture, who speak a different language, but we have to depend on an 8-year-old to connect us."
        Difficult, however, is exactly what Findlay signed up for when she took a job recruiting refugee families for American Prepatory Academy's second campus - The School for New Americans. The charter school, which opened its first set of doors in affluent, largely Caucasian Draper, chose its West Valley City site specifically to attract students like Ali who could use a leg up in education. Fifty percent of the school's student body are refugees and immigrants.
http://cli.gs/qMBnTd (DN)



$5M expansion of DaVinci in Ogden wrapping up

        OGDEN -- As DaVinci Academy of Science and the Arts students work to increase their knowledge, construction crews are applying finishing touches to a $5 million expansion project at the downtown charter school.
        Renovations to a 38,000-square-foot, three-story building at the southwest corner of 20th Street and Grant Avenue in the AmeriCan complex should be completed next month to keep pace with growing student enrollment, said Jessie Kidd, executive director of DaVinci Academy.
        The building connects to a 46,000-square-foot structure at the complex that already serves as DaVinci's main classroom facility.
        The school has issued $6.5 million in bonds, most of which will be used in connection with the expansion project.
        About $1.5 million has been allocated to purchase the existing main classroom facility from the Ogden Community Foundation, while $1.8 mil- lion has been used to buy the expansion building from Jon Peddie, a developer from Steamboat Springs, Colo.
        Renovations to the expansion building are being funded with $3.1 million in bond money, Kidd said.
http://cli.gs/U3uq2V (OSE)



Technology powers up learning in Ogden City School District

        OGDEN -- When the fourth-grade teacher announced it was time for recess, most of the class said no thanks.
        The Lincoln Elementary School students would rather have the extra time to work on their projects.
        "You can do recess every day, but it's not like the same project is going to come up every day," said student Lylee Nebeker.
        Lylee and her friends were in the middle of learning all they could about the water cycle and were preparing a group presentation -- not from boring old textbooks, but with computers and quickly accessed, credible information from the World Wide Web.
        A few were preparing a PowerPoint presentation, some were creating artwork, and others were doing research to write essays. Making a movie was also an option.
        And students were loving every minute of it.
http://cli.gs/hZBjtW (OSE)



Parents, district clash about medication

        For an untrained person, giving specific medical care in an emergency situation can be scary.
        To be a parent who knows his or her child might need care and won't be able to get it isn't exactly a walk in the park either.
        That's the dilemma two families at Snow Springs Elementary School in Lehi face with their children. Mike and Tara Mineer and Richard and Andrea Prestwich are neighbors with a unique commonality; each has a child who struggles with unexplained seizures. Doctors have given the families Diastat, a medicine intended to stop a seizure while it's happening.
        The obstacle they're running into now is that the district will not administer the medication at school, citing safety and liability concerns since most likely a school nurse will not be on hand to give the medication, which is a rectal suppository.
http://cli.gs/5BUL5d (PDH)



Schools plan H1N1 vaccinations

        Cache Valley schools are making preparations for a predicted outbreak of swine flu in coming months, including plans to carry out in-school vaccinations in November.
        After consulting with representatives from the Bear River Health Department (BRHD), officials from the Cache and Logan school districts plan to release information today informing parents that a swine flu vaccine is expected to become available in early November.
        BRHD will then set up vaccination clinics at the schools to distribute shots.
http://hjnews.townnews.com/articles/2009/09/28/news/news02-09-28-09.txt



Davis High students excel on AP tests

        KAYSVILLE -- During the 2008-09 school year, Davis High had the most students of any Utah school take Advance Placement tests and, with an 84.6 percent success rate, placed third in the state for passing scores.
        Delta High School had the most students passing AP tests, with 88 percent, and Juab High students had an 86.4 percent pass rate.
        Also drawing the spotlight to Davis High, said Principal Dee Burton, is the fact that 207 of the 672 students who took the tests received the AP Scholar Award.
        To get the award, students must pass three or more AP exams.
http://cli.gs/gD5RJM (OSE)



Local teen determined to succeed

        HARRISVILLE -- If Sergio Benson had to pick a theme song for his life, he'd choose "I'm a Go-Getter" by L'il Wayne.
        Benson himself is a go-getter. At 17, he's experienced hardships many of his fellow students at Weber High School could never imagine. From parents battling drug addictions, gang affiliations and jail time to months in foster care where he encountered beaten and neglected children, he's seen the sadder side of life.
http://cli.gs/L6qHXb (OSE)



Is Garfield School sale a hush-hush deal?
Government: Developer says presumed sale to Westminster College is too cozy.

        Salt Lake City's impending sale of a historic schoolhouse in Sugar House has elicited a crescendo from critics who argue the deal was greased -- with scant public input -- a curiosity given Mayor Ralph Becker's oft-trumpeted era of transparency.
        Quietly, the city is angling to sell the old Garfield School, 1838 S. 1500 East, for $2.2 million. All signs suggest nearby Westminster College will be the selected buyer, intent on expanding office space and establishing a fine-arts hub.
        But neighbors, and the lone developer erecting condos in the heart of Sugar House, insist the transaction talk is too quiet.
http://www.sltrib.com/utah/ci_13424248



Developer to donate property to Box Elder School Board

        BRIGHAM CITY - Box Elder School Board learned recently that a Willard developer wants to donate 12 to 13 acres to the district for a future elementary school.
        Doug Young, from Buckskin Land and Livestock, has purchased land between 650 South and 824 South in Willard and plans to build a planned unit development on the property.
http://cli.gs/Z09mhQ (OSE - $ Registration)




State Web site tracking stimulus funds

        SALT LAKE CITY -- Utah has a new Web site to track how federal stimulus money is being spent in the state.
        The site recovery.utah.gov lists the state agencies that are getting stimulus funds and for what programs. The state will also list how the agencies are using the federal money and what parts of Utah are benefiting.
http://cli.gs/d1sE2m (OSE)

http://cli.gs/aXpgEa (PDH)

http://cli.gs/d0UuBV (SGS)

http://connect2utah.com/content/news/story/?cid=53481

http://www.fox13now.com/news/sns-bc-ut--stimulus-utahwebsite,0,6448154.story

The site
http://recovery.utah.gov/




Judge releases ex-teacher from jail

        FILLMORE - A judge has released a former high-school teacher from jail ahead of his sentencing hearing for charges related to his sexual abuse of a student.
        Fourth District Court Donald Eyre granted a defense request Wednesday to allow Keith Lorraine Gillins to be released from jail so he can help his attorney prepare for an Sept. 30 sentencing hearing, according to court records.
        Gillins, who taught English and coached basketball at Millard High School and served for 12 years as the mayor of Fillmore, pleaded guilty in August to two counts of attempted rape, a first-degree felony, one count of attempted forcible sodomy, a first-degree felony, and two counts of forcible sexual abuse, both second-degree felonies.
http://cli.gs/r851TQ (DN)



Jordan coach is suspended, fined $750
Prep football: The UHSAA takes action after an ineligible player practices with team.


        Eric Kjar, the first-year head coach at Jordan High, has been suspended for tonight's game against Hillcrest and fined $750 by the Utah High School Activities Association, UHSAA Executive Director Rob Cuff told The Tribune.
        The suspension is the result of Kjar allowing a player who was previously ruled ineligible for the season by the UHSAA to practice with the team. The suspension and the fine, according to Cuff, were levied as the result of a hearing that took place Sept. 16.
http://www.sltrib.com/prepsports/ci_13416620

http://cli.gs/YWD5hr (DN)




Layton High School teacher-former student relationship investigation opened

        LAYTON -- Police in Layton have opened an investigation into allegations of an inappropriate relationship between a 62-year-old teacher at Layton High School and an 18-year-old former student.
        "I can confirm we have an active and ongoing investigation into an allegation that was made late Tuesday," Layton Police Lt. Quinn Moyes said Friday night.
        Detectives have been assigned, Moyes said, and several interviews have been conducted. Layton police do not know when the investigation will conclude or if other action will be taken.
http://cli.gs/rq5juu (OSE)

http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=8061762




Teen stable after parade injury
Broken collarbone, ribs for Syracuse mayor's daughter

        SYRACUSE - The 17-year-old girl injured Thursday after being run over by a trailer during the Syracuse High Homecoming parade is in stable condition.
        Janie Panucci, daughter of Syracuse Mayor Fred Panucci, was injured while participating in the small parade.
http://cli.gs/mJVyUq (OSE - $ Registration)

http://cli.gs/qusQAA (PDH)

http://cli.gs/RE7dAe (SGS)

http://connect2utah.com/content/news/story?cid=53152

http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=8048410

http://www.fox13now.com/news/sns-ap-ut--girlrunover,0,7044584.story




West Point Elementary School to celebrate 140 years

        WEST POINT - Angie Stewart cried as she helped prepare for West Point Elementary School's celebration of its 140th birthday.
        Sifting through old photos in scrapbooks provided by community members, the 29-year-old PTA president found pictures of her great-grandmother and her grandfather.
http://cli.gs/0Zj6GU (OSE)



Playwright aims to show reality of teaching
Production is meant to move all interested in education to action

        "Making Waves," a new play showing Saturday at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, is a look inside the lives of teachers.
        "It's what we think about, how we act and what we deal with on a daily basis," said educator-playwright Heidi Van Ert.
http://cli.gs/0aQ6zS (DN)




Students learn culture through music

        ST. GEORGE - Pine View High School band and orchestra students watched in amazement Friday morning as one Indian man tuned his 20-string sitar. Sandip Burman, a famous sitar and topla musician from Calcutta, India, put on a special clinic for the students in which he played his instruments and invited them to ask any musical question.
        Ed Candland, band, orchestra and guitar teacher at Pine View High School, said he was contacted by Burman's associate and asked if having the musician conducting a clinic was of interest.
http://cli.gs/rLH82a (SGS)



Students plant Utah state trees, wishes for the future

        SYRACUSE -- About 120 fourth-graders stretched out a 100-foot roll of white paper Friday on the lawn at Buffalo Point Elementary to get a full understanding of how tall their tree would grow.
        The children then planted a 2-foot blue spruce and looked toward the future with hopes of peace and prosperity.
        They also learned about nature and state symbols, said fourth-grade teacher Trudy Henderson.
http://cli.gs/1RShaz (OSE)




Students get hands-on lesson about careers in emergency services

        HOLLADAY -- Students at Crestview Elementary School explored some careers hands-on Thursday. More than 600 kids mingled with some of the men and women who serve our community at Crestview's Emergency Services Day.
        Students from preschool to sixth grade spent their day touring ambulances, talking to police, chatting with physicians and learning the ins and outs of firefighting.
http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=8044990



Facing the Past
Polk students peek at ancient Egypt

        OGDEN - Sixth-grader Bronte Fronk spent most of Wednesday morning with a mixture of gauze and plaster stuck to her face.
        As part of a lesson on ancient Egypt, the Polk Elementary School student and her classmates made death masks similar to those found on mummies.
http://cli.gs/eqm6GD (OSE - $ Registration)



High-flying delivery to Weber High
Helicopter ride to game proves being mascot not so bad after all

        PLEASANT VIEW - The life of a high school mascot isn't easy: stuffy costumes, jeering grade-schools, the occasional popcorn or drink to the face.
        But for the Weber High Warrior, whose identity was not disclosed, being a mascot sometimes has its perks.
        The Warrior, along with a pair of student body officers, delivered Friday night's game ball in good company as they landed on the 50-yeard line in a Utah Highway Patrol helicopter.
http://cli.gs/aaD7PV (OSE - $ Registration)




Inside Our Schools

        Gateway Preparatory Academy
        North Elementary
        Parowan Elementary
        Enoch Elementary
        East Elementary
        South Elementary
        Three Peaks Elementary
        Arrowhead Elementary
        Heritage Elementary
        Little Valley Elementary
http://cli.gs/yG286D (SGS)







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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Boost test scores
(St. George) Spectrum editorial

        Many a student through time has expressed apprehension about the results of a test. Students lose sleep because of anticipation while they await their scores.
        Imagine, then, the slight dose of anxiety that comes at the district level while awaiting the results of statewide proficiency tests. In recently released scores, the Washington County School District could celebrate over some results but has to come to the realization that more work is necessary in other subjects.
        About 8,000 elementary students and 10,500 secondary students took the tests in language arts, math and science. Scores among elementary students improved in language arts, declined in math and stayed the same in science. Among secondary students, scores improved in language arts and science but declined sharply in math.
        District officials are rightly pleased with the areas of improvement but should be concerned with lack of achievement in the areas that showed stagnant results or declines.
http://cli.gs/bvqbTH



A letter to fathers
Deseret News editorial

        Dear Daddy,
        Will you please do something for me? Can you spend time at my school? Can you spend more time with me?
http://cli.gs/UmsBNz



Beehives and Buffalo Chips
(Provo) Daily Herald editorial

        Beehive to a school that decided the show must go on, despite harassment by the owner of the Broadway classic's copyright. This year, the Heritage School wasn't allowed to advertise its production of "Fiddler on the Roof" because a national group was supposedly touring with the show. That's plain looney because that tour has concluded and the show never got closer to Utah County than California. But "it was kind of really too late to decide to do another show," said school CEO Glen Zaugg, so the kids went ahead. The final performance is 7:30 p.m. tonight at the Heritage School, 5600 N. Heritage School Drive, in Provo. Bravo to everyone at the school.
http://cli.gs/EeGvN5



Will No Child Left Behind finally get reauthorized?
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Lisa Schencker

        U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan gave a speech today urging a rewrite of No Child Left Behind. He wants to change but not scrap it.
        He said the law is flawed in that it too heavily emphasizes standardized tests, "unfairly labels many schools as failures" and doesn't account for academic growth.
        "But the biggest problem with NCLB is that it doesn't encourage high learning standards," Duncan said. "In fact, it inadvertently encourages states to lower them.  The net effect is that we are lying to children and parents by telling kids they are succeeding when they are not."
        Duncan did, however, credit NCLB for shining a light on the achievement gap between students of different backgrounds and abilities and for increasing accountability.
http://cli.gs/5vLgpb

http://cli.gs/VMjYNv (Ed Week - $ Registration)

http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2009/09/09242009.html#




The least fun game ever
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Lisa Schencker

        No Child Left Behind can seem complicated to many. There are a lot of factors that go into whether a school makes Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) toward the goals of No Child Left Behind.
        And that's where flow charts come in. I've seen many.
        But until this week, I had never seen an AYP flow chart presented as a sort of board game (a game that's probably even less fun that most board games). I thought this was worth sharing (courtesy of Jayme Leyba, curriculum administrator in the Uintah School District). I especially like the bubble that says, "End of this round. Don't worry you'll be playing again next year."
http://cli.gs/Xy41Sp



Charter school debate over?
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Kirsten Stewart

        Remember that Hoxby study out of New York that promised an "apples-to-apples" comparison of public charter schools to traditional schools?
        WAPO says the study means charter school opponents need a new line. No longer can they say charter schools "cream" the best and brightest students.
        Diane Ravitch, meanwhile, says the study's findings, though impressive, are "not typical of charter schools across the nation." From her Daily News guest editorial:
        "Nationally there are about 4,600 charter schools enrolling 1.4 million students. They run the gamut from excellent to abysmal. Even their most ardent supporters  recognize that they vary widely in quality."
http://cli.gs/GE7G11



Contest - Kids can create character for book
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Lisa Schencker

        Frank Cole, author of The Adventures of Hashbrown Winter is visiting schools in Utah this month and next to talk to students and present them with a contest.
        He's asking students to create a character that would go to Pordunce Elementary, the school featured in his books. The grand prize winner will get to see his/her character featured in the series' third book due out next year. The winner will also get a Barnes and Noble Gift Card and an advance copy of Cole's second book.
        Students in grades 1 to 6 can enter and entries are due by Nov. 15.
http://cli.gs/yTWyyA



Answers to bond questions
Commentary by Granite School District Superintendent Stephen Ronnenkamp

        1. How can we be sure the Board won't raise taxes for this bond - like the ballot says they can?
        The Board of Education has very publicly committed not to raise taxes to pay for these bonds.  Historically the Board of Education has kept its promises.  To break this promise would significantly compromise the ability of individual board members to be reelected.
        2. What is to hold the board to their commitment?
http://graniteblog.graniteschools.org/superintendentsblog/?p=77



Preparing for H1N1
Commentary by Jordan School District Superintendent Barry Newbold

        We receive a lot of questions about the H1N1 flu. Health officials repeatedly tell us the swine flu is coming and we need to be ready. We have a District H1N1 Flu Task Force made up of the administrative cabinet, Lisa Robinson (oversees nursing services), Melinda Colton (Director of Communications), and Steven Dunham (Communications Assistant). We meet regularly to review all information shared by national, state and county health officials, which we receive almost on a daily basis.
        So, how are we preparing?
http://barrysblog.jordandistrict.org/2009/09/preparing-for-h1n1/



Nice for them
Commentary by Charter Solutions President Lincoln Fillmore

        I want to congratulate the Canyons School District on the results of the study they commissioned. Sixty-eight percent of parents in the district have a "favorable impression" of the district. That's especially nice since only a small majority of citizens within the district voted for it.
        And now I get to brag. The statewide study of charter schools commissioned a few years back showed that an astonishing 94 percent of parents are satisfied with their charter school. By itself that's awesome--in context it is absolutely incredible.
        That combined with the recent study showing that charter school students widely outperform their peers teaches an important lesson.
        Those who seek to limit the growth of charter schools are consciously limiting access to the most supported and highest performing schools.
http://charterscool.blogspot.com/2009/09/nice-for-them.html



Expanding where the needs are
Commentary by Charter Solutions President Lincoln Fillmore

        Great article in the DNews today on the School for New Americans, the new expansion campus of American Preparatory Academy. APA has been successful both academically (95 percent of students score proficient on UPASS) and with enrollment (3200 students on its waiting list). So they have taken that track record and targeted their new program to refugees, largely from Africa.
http://charterscool.blogspot.com/2009/09/expanding-where-needs-are.html



UEA Has No Dealings With ACORN
Utah Policy Daily commentary by columnist LaVarr Webb

        The Utah Education Association has posted the following statement on its web site:
        Recent media attention on ACORN has generated questions about the organization's relationship with the Utah Education Association (UEA) and the National Education Association (NEA). The UEA has never donated nor had any direct contact with ACORN. UEA's national affiliate, the National Education Association, indicated in a statement it is not currently providing funding to, nor does it have any active contracts with, ACORN.
http://utahpolicy.com/blog_entry/individual/uea-has-no-dealings-with-acorn




Sounds crazy
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Roni Rowe

        The same week that my children were not allowed to watch President Barack Obama's speech at their school, they had a school assembly in which Brigham Young University students put on a play.
        Where was the parents' option to "opt-out" their children from that? What if I was afraid that the BYU students would infuse their play with Mormon ideas that I and my family do not believe in? What if I was worried that my children would be "brainwashed" by hidden messages?
        Do you see how crazy that sounds?
http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/ci_13422205



Sanction legislators
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Mary C. Lamb

        I wonder if anyone else found it odd to read two adjacent front-page articles in the Sept. 17 edition of The Tribune ? Lawmakers seem quite eager to impose tougher standards on public schools in order to promote accountability ("More Utah schools make the grade"), yet they are not willing to do the same for public servants ("Lawmakers push back against ethics initiative").
        It doesn't appear that education's benchmark of "adequate yearly progress" has been met by our legislators on ethics reform.
http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/ci_13422207



Brainwashing children
Deseret News letter from Neldon B. Jensen

        Many times we have heard children singing songs of praise to the dictator or king. Never in my memory have I heard of a song or lyrics to the person who is the president of the United States. I am insulted and also frightened by American children singing songs about President Barack Obama. I feel it is a blatant attempt to brainwash our elementary schoolchildren. We do not worship our presidents, and those who do are following the examples of Hitler, Castro, Chavez, Stalin and on and on.
        Stand up, America. This isn't right.
http://cli.gs/632h6g



Bush's speech also scrutinized
(St. George) Spectrum letter from John Shafer

        A Sept. 17 letter to the editor asked, "How come when President George H.W. Bush addressed school children ... on national TV there was no perceived problem." Public records show that the majority party in Congress not only denounced Bush's speech, they also ordered an investigation by the General Accounting Office and held hearings on the issue.
        The front page of The Washington Post proclaimed, "The White House turned a Northwest Washington junior high classroom into a television studio and its students into props."
http://cli.gs/RDRbuR



President was hypocritical in speech
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Erin Jewkes

        In the Sept. 13 letter, "What's wrong with setting goals, working hard?" the writer said that she was shocked that her children's' school had an "opt-out" option.
        I am shocked that she could not think of one reason that a parent would not want their child to attend! My children stayed home from school on the morning of the president's speech.
        No matter how good the words sound, I would never knowingly teach my children to heed hypocrisy. President Obama told the kids to set goals and work hard, but this goes against his policies of people depending on welfare programs like Cash for Clunkers and bailouts, for example, and big-government programs like universal health care.
http://cli.gs/jTDWbW ($ Registration)




Homework was main speech issue
(St. George) Spectrum letter from Heidi Sloan

        In response to the letter stating people against President Obama speaking to our children in school were radical and biased: What actually aired was not what people were upset about.
        I don't consider myself radical, but I am biased. I am biased in the opinion that a president should not think more of himself than his country. The problem some parents had was the preview of the initial address asking our kids what they could do for "him."
http://cli.gs/vBnhqG




Obama's school speech available on Web
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Dawni Schofield

        I would like to let parents and all citizens know that they can view all of President Obama's speech to America's students anytime they want to on Weber School District's Webertube. It includes the student body officer's speech.
http://cli.gs/zL42qH ($ Registration)




Reading Incomprehension
New York Times op-ed by TODD FARLEY, author of the forthcoming "Making the Grades: My Misadventures in the Standardized Testing Industry."

        LAST week, Education Secretary Arne Duncan acknowledged standardized tests are flawed measures of student progress. But the problem is not so much the tests themselves - it's the people scoring them.
        Many people remember those tests as lots of multiple-choice questions answered by marking bubbles with a No. 2 pencil, but today's exams nearly always include the sort of "open ended" items where students fill up the blank pages of a test booklet with their own thoughts and words. On many tests today, a good number of points come from such open-ended items, and that's where the real trouble begins.
        Multiple-choice items are scored by machines, but open-ended items are be scored by subjective humans who are prone to errors. I know because I was one of them. In 1994, I was a graduate student looking for part-time work. After a five-minute interview I got the job of scoring fourth-grade, state-wide reading comprehension tests. The for-profit testing company that hired me paid almost $8 an hour, not bad money for me at the time.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/28/opinion/28farley.html?ref=opinion (Registration)




Reading Is Not a Skill--And Why This Is a Problem for the Draft National Standards
Washington Post commentary by Daniel Willigham, Psychology Professor of the University of Virginia

        A draft of the voluntary national standards for reading was just released, and at first glance the 18 standards sound quite sensible: students should be able to determine what a text says, make inferences from it, discern the most important ideas, and so forth.
        Many of the standards boil down to this notion: "The student will be able to comprehend the text." For the others, comprehension is a prerequisite.
        The problem is that teachers and administrators are likely to read those 18 standards and to try to teach to them. But reading comprehension is not a "skill" that can be taught directly.
        We tend to teach comprehension as a series of "reading strategies" that can be practiced and mastered. Unfortunately it really doesn't work that way. The mainspring of comprehension is prior knowledge-the stuff readers already know that enables them to create understanding as they read.
http://cli.gs/ujsu40 (Registration)



Accountability in Education: High Hopes and False Promises
Washington Post commentary by Dorothy Rich, founder of the MegaSkills Teacher Training Programs

        It's IN, it's BIG. It's what passes for "glamour" in education today. It's called Accountability.
        Right now, accountability is being presented as the great problem solver. Yet, one big problem is that the teacher and the school are the ones being held accountable. It would be easier if it worked that way, but it doesn't. Instead, real accountability is an ever changing mix of a multitude of factors including teacher competency, student motivation, and parental responsibility.
        Accountability has been by and large very narrowly defined, mostly these days by whether schools get high or low grades based on student test scores.
        There are other accountability measures, but they are more complex and take longer to measure. One of them is whether the student who learns how to read actually does read. Another is how parents become more accountable to help children become successful learners.
        Accountability works in different ways and at different levels: One size does not fit all students.
http://cli.gs/0JBa9m (Registration)



School choice would reshape U.S. education
Philadelphia Inquirer op-ed by Robert Enlow, president and CEO of the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice

        Tomorrow in Philadelphia, two of politics' most interesting personalities - the Rev. Al Sharpton and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich - are expected to join Education Secretary Arne Duncan in kicking off a tour of America's urban public schools. Sharpton and Gingrich have said they intend to draw attention to persistent problems and promising remedies in education.
        In putting the spotlight on fixing education, this odd couple plus one should focus on reforms that actually have a shot at helping kids. The trio should use its bipartisan bully pulpit to focus on the one reform that can truly shake up public education: school choice.
http://cli.gs/QbauRv



Tackling Bullying Based on Sexual Identity
Education Week commentary by columnist Dakarai Aarons

        School bullying is a serious issue almost everywhere. But there's a growing concern about bullying targeting a particular population of students.
        Students who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (or who other students assume are) experience not only taunting and ridicule, but physical violence from some of their peers.
        A new research brief, published by GLSEN, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, found many "GLBT-identifying" middle school students were reporting harassment and hearing homophobic epithets at school on a regular basis.
        Thirty-nine percent of surveyed students said they had been physically assaulted, almost twice the 20 percent of high school students who reported similar treatment.
http://cli.gs/V9Wbtj

A copy of the study
http://cli.gs/umtXbq




Bad Title, Mind-Changing Book
Washington Post commentary by columnist Jay Matthews

        We education writers receive many books in the mail with terrible titles, real slumber-time stuff. Here are some on my bookshelf: "Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools"; "Rethinking High School Graduation Rates & Trends"; and "SREB Fact Book on Higher Education."
        Those volumes proved to be pretty good, as evidenced by the fact that I didn't throw them out. I mention this because on top of that stack is a new book that sets the record for largest gap between quality of work and liveliness of title.
        It is "Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses: Solving the Funding-Achievement Puzzle in America's Public Schools" by Eric A. Hanushek and Alfred A. Lindseth I forced myself to read it because it was on the agenda of a conference I was attending.
        I'm glad I did. It is enlightening, maddening, hopeful, frustrating and amazingly informative, all in just 411 pages. I don't like admitting this, but it even changed my mind on a hot issue, the connection between U.S. schools and U.S. economic success.
http://cli.gs/a1TVdZ (Registration)




Could Common State Standards Impact Quality?
National Journal commentary by Eliza Krigman et al

        The Common Core State Standards Initiative last week released a draft of its college and career-readiness standards for English language arts and mathematics for grades K-12. Led by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, this initiative has the Obama administration's strong support.
        How would you grade this draft? How could common state standards impact the quality of U.S. education?
http://cli.gs/8Z8Lzd




Nine Myths About Public Schools
Huffington Post commentary by Gerald Bracey, Fellow at the Education Policy Studies Laboratory at Arizona State University

        None of this will likely strike you as particularly new, but it might be good to have a bunch of myths lined up and debunked all in one place.
        1. The schools were to blame for letting the Russians get into space first.
        ...
        2. Schools alone can close the achievement gap.
        ...
        3. Money doesn't matter.
        ...
        4. The United States is losing its competitive edge.
        ...
        5. The U. S. has a shortage of scientists, mathematicians and engineers.
        ...
        6. Merit pay for teachers will improve performance.
        ...
        7. The fastest growing jobs are all high-tech and require postsecondary education.
        ...
        8. Test scores are related to economic competitiveness.
        ...
        9. Education itself produces jobs.
http://cli.gs/jQgdG6








-------------------------------------------------------------
NATIONAL NEWS
-------------------------------------------------------------

More school? Obama could trim summer break
President, education chief want to lengthen days, keep schools open later
Associated Press via MSNBC

        WASHINGTON - Students beware: The summer vacation you just enjoyed could be sharply curtailed if President Barack Obama gets his way.
        Obama says American kids spend too little time in school, putting them at a disadvantage with other students around the globe.
        "Now, I know longer school days and school years are not wildly popular ideas," the president said earlier this year. "Not with Malia and Sasha, not in my family, and probably not in yours. But the challenges of a new century demand more time in the classroom."
        The president, who has a sixth-grader and a third-grader, wants schools to add time to classes, to stay open late and to let kids in on weekends so they have a safe place to go.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33054056/ns/us_news-education/



Unions Criticize Obama's School Proposals as 'Bush III'
Washington Post

        To the surprise of many educators who campaigned last year for change in the White House, the Obama administration's first recipe for school reform relies heavily on Bush-era ingredients and adds others that make unions gag.
        Standardized testing, school accountability, performance pay, charter schools -- all are integral to President Obama's $4.35 billion "Race to the Top" grant competition to spur innovation. None is a typical Democratic crowd-pleaser.
        Labor leaders, parsing the Education Department's fine print, call the proposal little more than a dressed-up version of the No Child Left Behind law enacted seven years ago under Obama's Republican predecessor.
        "It looks like the only strategies they have are charter schools and measurement," said Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers. "That's Bush III." Weingarten, who praises Obama for massive federal aid to help schools through the recession, said her 1.4 million-member union is engaged in "a constructive but tart dialogue" with the administration about reform.
http://cli.gs/7Wm23R (Registration)



Phantom School Districts Tagged for Stimulus Dollars
ProPublica

        Hillcrest Rural Schools in north-central Kansas is set to get nearly $7,000 in federal stimulus money to help its disadvantaged students. Only one glitch: The district doesn't exist anymore. It closed in 2006 when it was merged into another nearby district.
        Hillcrest was one of nearly 14,000 school districts or local education agencies nationwide that the U.S. Department of Education reported would get stimulus funds under its Title I program.
        But some of those districts are phantoms because they were dissolved or merged.
        In Kansas, 11 school districts that no longer exist are on the U.S. Department of Education's distribution list for stimulus funds. They are set to receive nearly $600,000.
http://cli.gs/58d4yV



Kids' Obama song: Sincere or idolization?
Conservative opinion leaders outraged at seven-month-old video
Associated Press via MSNBC

        BURLINGTON TOWNSHIP, N.J. - A school for kindergartners through second-graders in a comfortable Philadelphia suburb has become the latest target of accusations by conservatives that schoolchildren are being indoctrinated to idolize President Barack Obama.
        The controversy grows out of a school assembly during Black History Month in February, when gripes about the freshly inaugurated president were still mostly hushed.
        That month, a group of smiley and fidgety students at B. Bernice Young School sang a medley of two short songs praising the president.
        The first song begins, "Mmm, mmm, mmm, Barack Hussein Obama/He said that all must lend a hand/To make this country strong again."
        The second one was set to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" and included the refrain, "Hooray, Mr. President."
        While the performance is seven months old, the outrage is new and came about because of the discovery of a YouTube video.
        It's been fodder for conservative opinion leaders such as columnist and blogger Michelle Malkin and Fox News Channel host Glenn Beck.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33031485/ns/us_news-education/

http://cli.gs/X65mmy (Fox News)

http://cli.gs/E7NJtd (Daily Voice)

Glen Beck
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPMnbyX5C4w



Management Guru Says 'Student Load' Key to Achievement
Study of Eight Districts Looks at School Autonomy
Education Week

        Management expert William G. Ouchi wants to let educators in on a secret: The key to improving student achievement is lightening teaching loads.
        Mr. Ouchi lays out that message in a new book, The Secret of TSL, published this month by Simon & Schuster of New York City. The letters stand for "total student load," which Mr. Ouchi defines as the number of students that teachers come in contact with each academic term and the number of papers they grade.
        In a not-yet-published study of 442 schools in eight large urban districts that have devolved power to local principals, Mr. Ouchi finds that schools that have reduced TSL in measurable ways also tend to have higher passing rates on state exams.
        "When you reduce TSL, you increase by far the likelihood that a student will encounter a teacher in a hallway or an office and have a one-on-one conversation that will motivate the student to keep going," Mr. Ouchi said. And that's different, he added, from simply reducing class sizes.
http://cli.gs/mHtZME ($ Registration)



Professor: Smaller Class Sizes Optimal For Kids
NPR All Things Considered

        State budget cuts across the country have meant layoffs for teachers and larger class sizes. Some schools is Los Angeles have as many as 43 students in a class. Jeremy Finn, a professor of education at the State University of New York-Buffalo, says from kindergarten through third grade classes with fewer than 20 students are best.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113176988



While Unnecessary, Swine Flu Closes Schools
NPR Morning Edition

        Across the nation, thousands of children already have missed school because of the swine flu pandemic. Most of those students are being kept home, while schools stay open, thanks to new guidance from the federal government. However, some schools continue to close, believing it's the only way to slow the spread of the virus.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113153996



Making Science Class The Coolest Period In School
NPR Talk of the Nation

        Ira Flatow and guests talk about some creative ways to make science class more fun for students and teachers, including blogging about original research, using social networks with classmates, making online video presentations and doing hands-on experiments with cockroaches.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113208981



What did Founding Fathers believe?
Finding a consensus will be tricky for those developing new state curriculum
Houston Chronicle

        AUSTIN - Texas schoolchildren should know how God and religion greatly influenced the country's Founding Fathers more than 230 years ago, say some of the experts reviewing the state's social studies curriculum.
        It is a viewpoint that troubles others who worry that a controlling majority of conservatives on the State Board of Education may go too far in pushing Christianity in public schools.
        To characterize the origins of this country as a Christian nation would be wrong, said Steven Schafersman, who routinely attends SBOE meetings as president of Texans Citizens For Science.
        "It is absolutely false," Schafersman said. "That kind of belief is dangerous."
        He is among several who argue that many of the Founding Fathers actually were deists - they believed in God as creator, who permits the universe to operate according to natural laws rather than continued intervention. As such, they did not believe the Bible or Jesus were divine.
        Finding common agreement on the religious angle could be tricky as state leaders develop new curriculum standards for social studies, including history, geography and economics.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/6640410.html



Series Introduction: Helping Our Teachers
NPR Weekend Edition Sunday

        Everyone from President Obama on down seems to agree that a good teacher can make a huge difference in a child's life. American schools have been trying for decades to improve teacher quality. The results are mixed. Over the next year, NPR will explore those efforts and take a look at the latest crop of teachers entering the profession.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113251794



Fairfax Schools Drop Out Of PTA
Splinter Groups Have Local Focus
Washington Post

        As the windows darkened in the Woodson High School library, dozens of mothers and fathers raised orange cards in the air and voted to sever the school's nearly five-decades-long relationship with the national PTA.
        The high school was one of two in Fairfax County this month that took steps to form independent parent groups, the latest blows to one of the nation's oldest and best-known child advocacy groups as it struggles to curtail an exodus of supporters.
        From a high mark of 12 million in the 1960s, national PTA membership has dropped to a little more than 5 million. Although school enrollments have ballooned, the PTA lost a million members in the past decade alone. Through the years, Washington's inner suburbs have been high-profile exceptions to the general decline. More than 90 percent of the schools in Fairfax, Arlington and Montgomery counties have PTAs, for instance, compared with about 25 percent nationally.
        But even here, there are worrisome signs for the future of the PTA.
http://cli.gs/mRtsaY (Registration)



In Search of The Real Michelle Rhee
Arrogant or dynamic? Harsh or honest? Inside the mind of D.C.'s controversial schools chief
Washington Post Magazine

        When Michelle Rhee was a teenager -- long before anyone imagined she would ever spend her career trying to turn America's inner-city public schools into something more like the elite private school she attended back in Ohio -- she was a stellar student, a good field hockey player and a kind, caring friend. But she already had the mouth for which she has become infamous. She said what was on her mind, even if it stung. Finally, one day, her mother had just had it with her daughter's blunt, even brusque, manner. Inza Rhee said to Michelle, "What is wrong with you? You just don't care what people think of you!"
http://cli.gs/SaJDyM (Registration)



Can the Right Kinds of Play Teach Self-Control?
New York Times Magazine

        ...
        Over the last few years, a new buzz phrase has emerged among scholars and scientists who study early-childhood development, a phrase that sounds more as if it belongs in the boardroom than the classroom: executive function. Originally a neuroscience term, it refers to the ability to think straight: to order your thoughts, to process information in a coherent way, to hold relevant details in your short-term memory, to avoid distractions and mental traps and focus on the task in front of you. And recently, cognitive psychologists have come to believe that executive function, and specifically the skill of self-regulation, might hold the answers to some of the most vexing questions in education today.
        The ability of young children to control their emotional and cognitive impulses, it turns out, is a remarkably strong indicator of both short-term and long-term success, academic and otherwise. In some studies, self-regulation skills have been shown to predict academic achievement more reliably than I.Q. tests. The problem is that just as we're coming to understand the importance of self-regulation skills, those skills appear to be in short supply among young American children.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/magazine/27tools-t.html?ref=magazine (Registration)



Policing kids' online behavior
Some schools monitor off-campus conduct
Detroit Free Press

        Should schools police student conduct on the Web if the conduct takes place off campus?
        At Brother Rice High School in Bloomfield Hills, the policy on Internet usage says that students can be held accountable for what they say or post online, even if the action occurs away from school.
        "We're extending our standards online," school president John Birney said. "We would expect them to conduct themselves online the same as they would in person."
        The policy is stricter than those for most schools, which typically regulate Internet use among students only at school. So far at Brother Rice, no students have been expelled under the policy, though the all-boys Catholic school reserves that right.
http://cli.gs/essbHd



When the Cool Get Hazed
New York Times

        Girl-on-girl bullying or hazing is old news by now, for anyone who has seen "Mean Girls" or "Heathers" or "Gossip Girl": popular girls organize a perfectly-coiffed and designer-clothed gang; fringe girl is targeted; bullies use their meanness and power to further marginalize fringe girl and reassert their status.
        But news of a "slut list" at a top-ranked New Jersey high school last week highlighted two disturbing points: the increasingly explicit and sexual nature of the taunts, magnified by the Internet. And, in another twist, the perception that allegations of promiscuity - however fictional - are a badge of honor, a way into the cool group, and not a cause for shame.
        The result is a 180-degree reversal of what a "slut list" might have meant, especially when the parents of these girls were growing up.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/weekinreview/27kelly.html?ref=education (Registration)



New Dating Seminars Target Teen Violence
NPR Morning Edition

        School officials are worried that too many teens are hitting and slapping the person they're dating. To target this dating abuse, violence prevention classes are springing up in schools around the country.
        This fall, middle and high schools in Wichita, Kan.; Providence, R.I.; Boise, Idaho; the Bronx in New York; Boston; and six other cities have lined up programs based on a curriculum that has proven effective in Ontario.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113211662



Coming Out in Middle School
New York Times Magazine

        Austin didn't know what to wear to his first gay dance last spring. It was bad enough that the gangly 13-year-old from Sand Springs, Okla., had to go without his boyfriend at the time, a 14-year-old star athlete at another middle school, but there were also laundry issues. "I don't have any clean clothes!" he complained to me by text message, his favored method of communication.
        When I met up with him an hour later, he had weathered his wardrobe crisis (he was in jeans and a beige T-shirt with musical instruments on it) but was still a nervous wreck. "I'm kind of scared," he confessed. "Who am I going to talk to? I wish my boyfriend could come." But his boyfriend couldn't find anyone to give him a ride nor, Austin explained, could his boyfriend ask his father for one. "His dad would give him up for adoption if he knew he was gay," Austin told me. "I'm serious. He has the strictest, scariest dad ever. He has to date girls and act all tough so that people won't suspect."
        Austin doesn't have to play "the pretend game," as he calls it, anymore. At his middle school, he has come out to his close friends, who have been supportive.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/magazine/27out-t.html?ref=magazine (Registration)



Football highest in injuries, study shows
Associated Press via Education Week

        JACKSON, Miss. - Willie Collins hasn't forgotten his days as a football player in the 1970s, well before many of the advances in modern sports medicine.
        Frequent backaches and his recent hip replacement surgery provide all the reminders Collins would ever need or want.
        "A lot of times when we were hurt, we played right through it," said Collins, 55, a longtime coach at Provine High and former standout offensive linemen for Jackson State University. "Those things catch up with you later in life. I know they caught up with me."
        Injuries are as much a staple of youth and high school sports as Gatorade and overzealous parents, and, according to a recent study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine, result in 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations annually.
        Among the nine sports surveyed, football had the highest injury rate. Next highest in order were wrestling - which is almost nonexistent in Mississippi schools, girls basketball and girls soccer.
        Knee (nearly 30 percent), ankle (12.3) and shoulder (10.9) injuries were most prevalent.
http://cli.gs/s8uE6r ($ Registration)

A copy of the study
http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/37/9/1798.abstract



Thinking Outside The School Lunchbox
Va. to Follow Md.'s Homegrown Lead
Washington Post

        Lunch menus at several local schools are getting a makeover: Less mystery meat, canned fruit and sad-looking green beans. More fresh fruit, veggies, eggs, cheese and meat from farms just down the road.
        Slowly, the buy-local phenomenon, which has made farmers markets and harvest subscriptions all the rage, is hitting school lunch programs. Maryland dubbed last week Homegrown School Lunch Week and encouraged cafeteria staffs to use local produce. Virginia plans to organize a similar statewide event in November.
http://cli.gs/P2qrAU (Registration)



Tony Danza Shows High School Students Who's Boss
NPR All Things Considered

        Tony Danza has starred in sitcoms like Taxi and Who's the Boss?. He's been in an Oscar-winning film, Crash. He's cut an album, hosted his own talk show and appeared on Broadway.
        Now, he's playing to a much smaller venue. Danza is teaching English to a class of 26 sophomores at Northeast High School in Philadelphia for a reality show to air next year on A&E.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113166330












------------------------------------------------------------
CALENDAR
------------------------------------------------------------

USOE Calendar
        http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9



UEN Events Calendar
        http://www.uen.org/News/news_group.cgi?category_id=3


October 2:
        Utah State Board of Education meeting
        250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
        http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/agenda.htm


October 8:
        Utah State Charter School Board meeting
        250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
        http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/Board/schedule.htm


October 20:
        Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
        1 p.m., Room C445, State Capitol
        http://www.le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2009&Com=APPEXE


October 21:
        Education Interim Committee meeting
        9 a.m., Room 445 State Capitol
        http://www.le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2009&Com=INTEDU




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