[Library Media] Creative Problem Solving

Fawn Morgan FMORGAN at dsdmail.net
Tue Mar 5 08:30:21 MST 2013


Hi, George-the-distant :-)



Right on! Loved your response.

You state, "The 'why' of written research in the schools should lead naturally to problem-solving in the real world. The “why” should also help avoid “re-inventing the wheel” and provide insight into what others have done to approach a problem. Above all, it would enhance the “personal” level of creativity Sir Ken Robinson suggests: a student becoming aware of 'what is my place in the world? What can I contribute?' "

Every year at sophomore orientation I try to present a justification for becoming skilled in research by talking about personal real world applications; in real life I research to problem solve. Throughout the year when students develop essential questions I explain that their research should present an original solution or hypothesis. Understandably, at 15 it is unlikely that no one will have presented the same answer, but it will, at the least, be original for them. They will have to think creatively, outside their own personal box. I do have one teacher that requires a lit review. Most teachers, however, gloss over the question part entirely and jump into the theses with little pre-search.



Fawn-the-nearer

Fawn B. Morgan, Teacher Librarian, Lancer Library, Layton High School     801-402-4996   Follow us on Facebook
________________________________________
From: georgeweight at integrity.com [georgeweight at integrity.com]
Sent: Saturday, March 02, 2013 6:25 AM
To: Fawn Morgan
Cc: USOE Library Media Listserv
Subject: Re: [Library Media] Creative Problem Solving

Fawn, you've provided a great deal of insight in your reaction and
interpretation of this video. Sir Ken Robinson ends with the statement
“…creativity is not an option, it’s an absolute necessity.”

In view of the way we conventionally teach research, we may need to take
another look. Research in the curriculum generally takes one of two forms.
The first of these is labeled “original” or experimental research such as
might be performed in a science lab, or in a social science field project.
The second is the formal paper.

It's been my experience that we approach these two types of research as
separate objectives in the curriculum when they really need a more
holistic approach. The “why” of written research in the schools should
lead naturally to problem-solving in the real world. The “why” should also
help avoid “re-inventing the wheel” and provide insight into what others
have done to approach a problem. Above all, it would enhance the
“personal” level of creativity Sir Ken Robinson suggests: a student
becoming aware of “what is my place in the world? What can I contribute?”

 Much of the time, the two research types really don’t get effectively
coupled together until a student becomes involved in a Master’s Thesis or
a Doctoral Dissertation, where a “Review of the Literature” section
becomes foundational  to an original research project.  To my knowledge,
they’re not yet even considered together in most University Bachelor
programs (B.Y.U.’s field involvement for Bachelor candidates may be a
step in the right direction. Do any of you know if other universities
have similar trends?)

It seems to me we could push more of this coupling up down to the
secondary school level, and that doing so would instill more creative
thinking/problem solving into our students. What do you all think?

We DO need to keep pushing for more funding and support.

Thanks. George Weight (now becoming a distant-past president of UELMA.)


> Friends
>
>
>
> Sir Ken Robinson is specifically talking about students becoming
creators
> of digital content in this video, but the link to creativity in
> information problem solving seems evident to me. Our core asks us to
prepare students to solve their own problems and present the results in
a
> creative manner. When I get a chance to discuss our research process I
emphasize that it is not a linear one, just as creativity is not a
linear
> process.
>
>
>
> As those students develop higher level thinking skills in using
> information they become ready for the business force that Sir Ken
mentions. "Teaching creativity systematically" - that's what we do, or
could do if given sufficient support! (sigh)
> http://www.adobe-creativity.com/?trackingid=KDLBC#
>
>
>
> Fawn B. Morgan, Teacher Librarian, Lancer Library, Layton High School

> 801-402-4996   Follow us on Facebook
> _______________________________________________
> library-media mailing list
> library-media at lists.uen.org
> https://lists.uen.org/mailman/listinfo/library-media
>
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