[library-media] FW: SIRS E-mail Bulletins #26 & #27: Tips & Tricks AND Applied Learning

Paula Zsiray paula.zsiray@cache.k12.ut.us
Mon, 15 Sep 2003 10:32:37 -0600


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SIRS E-MAIL BULLETINS #26 & #27
TIPS & TRICKS and APPLIED LEARNING
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TIPS & TRICKS:  "Accessing Multiple Browser Windows"
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DID YOU KNOW THAT MORE THAN ONE BROWSER WINDOW CAN BE OPEN AT A TIME?
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***
This is very useful if you have done a search and wish to examine the
results without losing your place. Or, if you want to compare articles =
or
graphics, you can go back and forth between all open windows.

In Netscape or Internet Explorer, you can have multiple windows open
simultaneously. There are 3 ways this can be accomplished:

1. Select New Window from the File menu.

2. On a PC, right-click a link and select Open in New Window from the =
menu
that appears, or simply hold down the SHIFT button while clicking on a =
link.
    On a Mac, hold the mouse down on a link and select New Window from =
the
menu that appears.

3. Sometimes you will click a link and it will automatically open in a =
new
window. SIRS has been programmed to do so whenever you encounter a link =
to a
Web site.

HOW CAN YOU TELL IF YOU HAVE MORE THAN ONE BROWSER WINDOW OPEN?
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* If you are on a new page and you cannot use the Go menu or Back button =
to
get back to a previous page -- either you just opened a page in a new =
window
or the last link you clicked was programmed to open a new window.

* For PC users, notice the taskbar has a button for every window that =
you
have open in your browser.

* For Mac users, the best way is to look at the bottom of the Windows =
menu
(Netscape) or the File menu (Explorer) for the list of browser windows =
that
are open. The windows will be listed by the title of the Web page.

HOW DO I CLOSE NEW BROWSER WINDOWS?
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1. Use the drop-down menu option, File then Close

2. Use the regular Windows or Macintosh window closing technique by
selecting the close box in the upper corner of the window.

HOW CAN I MOVE BETWEEN TWO OR MORE BROWSER WINDOWS?
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1. Use the task bar (for those with Windows operating systems)

2. Netscape users (both Windows and Macintosh versions) can use the =
browser
menu. Select Communicator then Window to see a list of open browser =
windows.
Highlight the window you wish to view and it will move to the top.

3. PC users may also hold down the Alt button and then hit the Tab =
button to
cycle through all available windows.

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APPLIED LEARNING: "Civics & Government"
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SIRS RESEARCHER: CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT
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SIRS Researcher connects with National Standards for Civics and =
Government.
Follow the directions below to find just a few articles that support a
portion of the Grade 9-12 content standards of the National Standards =
for
Civics and Government: http://www.civiced.org/912toc.htm

9-12 CONTENT STANDARDS
II. WHAT ARE THE FOUNDATIONS OF THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SYSTEM?

A. WHAT IS THE AMERICAN IDEA OF CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT?

>>From the SIRS Researcher portal page, perform a Subject Heading search =

>>for
"U.S. Constitution".
>Select the heading U.S. Constitution.
>View the articles "The Constitutional Duties of Congress", "Faith of=20
>our
Forefathers", "The Strong President: The Constitution and the Executive" =
and
"Is Ours the Best Among World's Constitutions?"

B. WHAT ARE THE DISTINCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF AMERICAN SOCIETY?

>>From the SIRS Researcher portal page, perform a Subject Heading search =

>>for
"melting pot".                     >Select the SEE reference link to the
term Assimilation (Sociology).
>View the articles "American Diversity and the 2000 Census", "America's
Melting Pot Spreads to the 'Burbs", "America's New Not-Melting Pot".
>>Then perform a Subject Heading search for "separation of church and
state". Under the heading Church and state.
>View the articles "Church, State and the Faith-Based Initiative",=20
>"Freedom
from Religion" and "Church and State: Freedom of Religion, Freedom from
Religion".
>>Then perform a Subject Heading search for "Individualism".
>Under the heading Individualism, view the articles "How American
Individualism is Evolving", "A Nation of Meddlers" and "Individualism =
Runs
Amok in the Marketplace".

C. WHAT IS AMERICAN POLITICAL CULURE?

>>From the SIRS Researcher portal page, perform a Subject Heading search =

>>for
"Political culture".
>Under the heading Political culture, review the articles "Crises Create =

>a
Political Whiplash" and "Two Towns Bring Forth 2 Points of View".
>>Perform a Subject Heading search for "Practical politics".
>Under the heading Practical politics, review the articles "2002=20
>Elections
Produce 6 Lessons in Politics", "Politics Changing Along with U.S. =
Society"
and "Americans' One Political Desire: Centrism"

D. WHAT VALUES AND PRINCIPLES ARE BASIC TO AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL
DEMOCRACY?

>>From the SIRS Researcher portal page, perform a Subject Heading search =

>>for
"federalism". >Select the SEE reference link to the term Federal =
government.
>Review the articles "States' Rights and Foreign Policy", "Recalibrating =

>the
Power Balance" and "Federalism: Perspectives on Current Issues".
>>Perform a Keyword phrase search for "separation of powers", sort by
relevance.
>Review the following articles from the results list: "Arguments=20
>Continue
Today over Separation of Powers", "In Defense of the Exclusionary Rule" =
and
"Can America Govern Itself: The World's Most Stable Democracy".
>>Perform a Subject Heading search for "Judicial Review."
>From the subject heading results, select the following articles, "The=20
>Power
of Judicial Review" and "The Judiciary".
>>Lastly, perform a Subject Heading search for "Bill of Rights".
>Under the heading "U.S., Constitution, Amendments, 1st-10th" view the
following articles "Thoughts on the Roots and Evolution of the Bill of
Rights", "African-Americans and the Bill of Rights" and "Reining in
Citizens' Rights"

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SIRS DISCOVERER: CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT
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SIRS Discoverer connects with National Standards for Civics and =
Government.
Follow the directions below to find just a few articles that support a
segment of the Grade 5-8 content standards of the National Standards for
Civics and Government: http://www.civiced.org/58toc.htm

5-8 CONTENT STANDARDS
I. WHAT ARE CIVIC LIFE, POLITICS, AND GOVERNMENT?

A. WHAT IS CIVIC LIFE? WHAT IS POLITICS? WHAT IS GOVERNMENT? WHY ARE
GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS NECESSARY? WHAT PURPOSES SHOULD GOVERNMENT =
SERVE?

>>Go to the Funk and Wagnalls New Encyclopedia and perform a Keyword=20
>>search
for politics. Select and read the article "Political Science".
>>From Discoverer's main portal page, perform a Subject Heading search=20
>>for
political science. >Under the Subject Heading Political science, select =
the
articles "The Jargon of Politics" and "Politics." In addition, the =
article
"Politics and Public Service" includes a discussion of why individuals =
get
involved in public service and what it takes to be a public servant.
>>Perform a Subject Heading search for Federal government.
>Select the heading Federal government.
>The article "Government--A Wide Range of Activities" provides examples=20
>of
all the different areas of life where government performs a role.

B. WHAT ARE THE ESSENTIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF LIMITED AND UNLIMITED
GOVERNMENT?

>>Perform a Keyword search for "checks and balances".
>From the results list, the articles "Three Branches of the U.S.=20
>Government"
and "The Constitution" explain some key concepts of limited government, =
such
as federalism and checks and balances.
>>Go to the Funk and Wagnalls New Encyclopedia and perform a Keyword=20
>>search
for unlimited government.
>View the articles "Government" and "Absolutism".

C. WHAT ARE THE NATURE AND PURPOSES OF CONSTITUTIONS?

>>Perform a Subject Heading search for constitutions.
>Under the Subject Heading Constitutions.
>View the article "Convention for a United Europe", which explains=20
>efforts
to draft a constitution for the European Union.
>>Under the Subject Heading "Constitutions, State".
>View the article "The Constitution", which includes an explanation of=20
>the
origins of the U.S. Constitution and a discussion of John Adams' defense =
of
state constitutions.

D. WHAT ARE ALTERNATIVE WAYS OF ORGANIZING CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENTS?

>>Go to Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia and perform a Keyword search=20
>>for
"constitutional government".
>Select and read "Articles of Confederation".
>>Perform a Keyword search for parliament.
>Select the articles "Parliament, British" and "Parliament, Canadian".

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For more information on the "tips," Applied Learning or any of SIRS
products, please contact SIRS Customer Service at 1-800-232-7477 (press
"1"), e-mail custserve@sirs.com or visit our Web site at www.sirs.com.